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Our Daily Bread 7 May 2019 Devotional – Someone Who Leads

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Our Daily Bread 7 May 2019, Our Daily Bread 7 May 2019 Devotional – Someone Who Leads

Our Daily Bread 7 May 2019 Devotional – Someone Who Leads

Topic: Someone Who Leads

Bible in a Year: 2 Kings 1–3; Luke 24:1–35

Key Verse: As surely as the Lord lives and as you live, I will not leave you. – 2 Kings 2:6

Today’s Scripture: 2 Kings 2:1–6 (NIV)

Insight: An interesting facet of Elijah and Elisha’s journey described in 2 Kings 2:1–6 is that, aside from Bethel, it includes some of the places important to the Israelites’ entrance into the promised land. At Gilgal the children of Israel stopped for their first Passover celebration in the land and for the circumcision of males born in the wilderness (Joshua 5). Jericho was the first major conquest as the people began taking possession of the land (Joshua 6).

And the Jordan River was the point where the Israelites entered the land as God miraculously parted the waters (Joshua 3). Crossing this river would have reminded them of the parting of the Red Sea forty years earlier, which had allowed their ancestors to cross from Egypt to freedom and life as a new nation. By: Bill Crowder

Message: Our Daily Bread 7 May 2019 Devotional

Who do you think of when you hear the word mentor? For me, it’s Pastor Rich. He saw my potential and believed in me when I didn’t believe in myself. He modeled how to lead by serving in humility and love. As a result, I am now serving God by mentoring others.

The prophet Elijah played a critical role in Elisha’s growth as a leader. Elijah found him plowing a field and invited him to be his protégé after God told him to anoint Elisha as his successor (1 Kings 19:16, 19). The young mentee watched his mentor perform incredible miracles and obey God no matter what. God used Elijah to prepare Elisha for a lifetime of ministry.

Toward the end of Elijah’s life, Elisha had the opportunity to leave. Instead, he chose to renew his commitment to his mentor. Three times Elijah offered to release Elisha from his duties, yet each time he refused, saying, “As surely as the Lord lives and as you live, I will not leave you” (2 Kings 2:2, 4, 6). As a result of Elisha’s faithfulness, he too was used by God in extraordinary ways. Our Daily Bread 7 May 2019

We all need someone who models what it means to follow Jesus. May God give us godly men and women who help us grow spiritually. And may we too, by the power of His Spirit, invest our lives in others. By Estera Pirosca Escobar

Reflect & Pray
Who are mentors that are currently building into you or who have built into your life? Why is it vital for us to mentor others in Jesus?

Father God, thank You for placing people in our lives to challenge and encourage us. Help us to do the same for others.

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Our Daily Bread

Our Daily Bread 27 May 2019 – A Living Memorial of Kindness

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Our Daily Bread 7 May 2019, Our Daily Bread 7 May 2019 Devotional – Someone Who Leads

Our Daily Bread 27 May 2019 – A Living Memorial of Kindness

Topic: A Living Memorial of Kindness

Bible in a Year: 2 Chronicles 1–3; John 10:1–23
Key Verse: David asked, “Is there anyone still left of the house of Saul to whom I can show kindness for Jonathan’s sake?” – 2 Samuel 9:1

Today’s Scripture: 2 Samuel 9:1–7 (NIV)

Insight: Jonathan’s father, Saul, had hated David with murderous envy (1 Samuel 18:1–16). Even though showing kindness to a surviving member of Saul’s house could’ve been met with lingering animosity, David made the choice to honor Jonathan’s family. He learned that one of Jonathan’s sons, Mephibosheth, was still living, although injured and permanently disabled.

He’d been dropped by a nursemaid in the confusion following news of his father’s and grandfather’s deaths (2 Samuel 4:4). David himself would someday need mercy (Psalm 25:11). His kindness foreshadowed the coming of Christ (Luke 1:26–27), for whose sake God asks us to show mercy and kindness to one another. By: Mart DeHaan

Message: Our Daily Bread 27 May 2019

I grew up in a church full of traditions. One came into play when a beloved family member or friend died. Often a church pew or possibly a painting in a hallway showed up not long afterward with a brass plate affixed: “In Memory of . . .” The deceased’s name would be etched there, a shining reminder of a life passed on. I always appreciated those memorials. And I still do. Yet at the same time they’ve always given me pause because they are static, inanimate objects, in a very literal sense something “not alive.” Is there a way to add an element of “life” to the memorial?

Following the death of his beloved friend Jonathan, David wanted to remember him and to keep a promise to him (1 Samuel 20:12–17). But rather than simply seek something static, David searched and found something very much alive—a son of Jonathan (2 Samuel 9:3). David’s decision here is dramatic. He chose to extend kindness (v. 1) to Mephibosheth (vv. 6–7) in the specific forms of restored property (“all the land that belonged to your grandfather Saul”) and the ongoing provision of food and drink (“you will always eat at my table”).

As we continue to remember those who’ve died with plaques and paintings, may we also recall David’s example and extend kindness to those still living. By John Blase

Reflect & Pray
Who has died that you don’t want to forget? What might a specific kindness to another person look like for you?

Jesus, give me the strength to extend kindness in memory of the kindness others have shown me, but most important because of Your great kindness.

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Our Daily Bread

Our Daily Bread 26 May 2019 – The Call To Courage

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Our Daily Bread 26 May 2019 – The Call To Courage

Today’s Topic: The Call To Courage

Bible in a Year: 1 Chronicles 28–29; John 9:24–41
Key Verse: Be strong and courageous. – 1 Chronicles 28:20

Today’s Scripture: 1 Chronicles 28:8–10, 19–21 (NIV)

Insight: Because David was a warrior who had shed much blood, he wasn’t permitted to build God’s temple (1 Chronicles 28:3). Instead, the task was to be carried out by his son Solomon who was “a man of peace” (22:8–10). Knowing that Solomon had two difficult tasks ahead—to be as good a king as David was and to build a house for God to dwell in—David reminded Solomon that God would give him success only if Solomon was “unswerving in carrying out [God’s] commands and laws” (28:7). Four hundred years earlier, Moses told his successor Joshua the same truth (Joshua 1:7–8). Their obedience didn’t indicate perfection but was evidence of their devotion to and trust in God.

Message: Our Daily Bread 26 May 2019

Among a display of male statues (Nelson Mandela, Winston Churchill, Mahatma Gandhi, and others) in London’s Parliament Square, stands a lone statue of a woman. The solitary woman is Millicent Fawcett, who fought for the right of women to vote. She’s immortalized in bronze—holding a banner displaying words she offered in a tribute to a fellow suffragist: “Courage calls to courage everywhere.” Fawcett insisted that one person’s courage emboldens others—calling timid souls into action.

As David prepared to hand his throne over to his son Solomon, he explained the responsibilities that would soon rest heavy on his shoulders. It’s likely Solomon quivered under the weight of what he faced: leading Israel to follow all God’s instructions, guarding the land God had entrusted to them, and overseeing the monumental task of building the temple (1 Chronicles 28:8–10).

Our Daily Bread 26 May 2019

Knowing Solomon’s trembling heart, David offered his son powerful words: “Be strong and courageous . . . . Do not be afraid or discouraged, for the Lord God, my God, is with you” (v. 20). Real courage would never arise from Solomon’s own skill or confidence but rather from relying on God’s presence and strength. God provided the courage Solomon needed.

When we face hardship, we often try to drum up boldness or talk ourselves into bravery. God, however, is the one who renews our faith. He will be with us. And His presence calls us to courage. – By Winn Collier

Reflect & Pray
What causes your heart to tremble in fear? How can you seek God’s presence and power in moving toward courage?

God, I’m often so afraid. And when I am, I’m tempted to rely on my own wits or courage—and that’s never enough. Be with me. Give me Your courage.

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Our Daily Bread 25 May 2019 – Shackled But Not Silent

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Our Daily Bread 7 May 2019, Our Daily Bread 7 May 2019 Devotional – Someone Who Leads

Our Daily Bread 25 May 2019 – Shackled But Not Silent

Today’s Topic: Shackled But Not Silent

Bible in a Year: 1 Chronicles 25–27; John 9:1–23

Key Verse: About midnight Paul and Silas were praying and singing hymns to God, and the other prisoners were listening to them. – Acts 16:25

Today’s Scripture: Acts 16:25–34 (NIV)

Insight: We’re not always given all the details of stories in the Bible, but we can be assured the authors of Scripture were inspired to record what was necessary to convey the meaning and message God intended. Acts 16:31–32 is a good example of this. Verse 31 is clearly a condensed version of the gospel: “Believe in the Lord Jesus, and you will be saved.”

The whole of the gospel is captured in this statement, but verse 32 indicates the jailer and his family still needed further instruction about what it means to follow Christ: “Then they spoke the word of the Lord to him and to all the others in his house.” We’re not told the details of what Paul and Silas included in “the word of the Lord.”

Message: Our Daily Bread 25 May 2019

In the summer of 1963, after an all-night bus ride, US civil rights activist Fannie Lou Hamer and six other black passengers stopped to eat at a diner in Winona, Mississippi. After law enforcement officers forced them to leave, they were arrested and jailed. But the humiliation wouldn’t end with unlawful arrest. All received severe beatings, but Fannie’s was the worst. After a brutal attack that left her near death she burst out in song: “Paul and Silas was bound in jail, let my people go.” And she didn’t sing alone. Other prisoners, restrained in body but not in soul, joined her in worship.

According to Acts 16, Paul and Silas found themselves in a difficult place when they were imprisoned for telling others about Jesus. But discomfort didn’t dampen their faith. “About midnight Paul and Silas were praying and singing hymns to God” (v. 25). Their bold worship created the opportunity to continue to talk about Jesus. “Then they spoke the word of the Lord to [the jailer] and to all the others in his house” (v. 32).

Most of us will not likely face the extreme circumstances encountered by Paul, Silas, or Fannie, but each of us will face uncomfortable situations. When that happens, our strength comes from our faithful God. May there be a song in our hearts that will honor Him and give us boldness to speak for Him—even in the midst of trouble. – By Arthur Jackson

Reflect & Pray
When was the last time you found yourself in a difficult situation? How did God help you live out your faith and witness?

Hard times call for prayer and praise to the One who controls all things.

Thanks for reading Our Daily Bread 25 May 2019 – Shackled But Not Silent. Please share with me.

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